THE INAUGURAL MOTH ART PRIZE AWARDED TO DAVID PIDDOCK

Moth Magazine
David's work 'Triton at Jubilee Bridge' is used for the front cover.

The Moth is an international arts and literature magazine which launched its first art prize in 2016 allowing the submission of up to ten works. See magazine's press release "Controversial paintings win inaugural Moth art prize...."


The Muse Gallery

otting Hill's Muse Gallery offered the opportunity to see a remarkable group of paintings in London for the first time. 'Unseen', until then, because they were excluded from an exhibition hosted by a City institution, in 2015, in a bizarre act of censorship that was later reported in Private Eye Magazine. 'Unseen', also, in the sense that they are a semi-fictional take on London. Imagery is often plundered from the past to inform the present. So anything from a small terracotta maquette to a monumental Canova sculpture might materialise in unexpected places like London's Embankment or the riverside adjacent to the City. Read more...


Contact The Muse Gallery
Contact The Adam Gallery
Download the Catalogue PDF here

David Piddock - Unseen Work
Why Brad darling this painting is a masterpiece! Oil on gesso board. 44 x 148 cms.
Apart from this piece all 'Sights Unseen' works can be viewed in 'current work' or 'catalogue pdf'
 

It is now possible to view all works in public collections online. View David Piddock's work at the Museum of London HERE.

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SIGHTS UNSEEN

Notting Hill's Muse Gallery offered the opportunity to see a remarkable group of paintings in London for the first time. 'Unseen', until then, because they were excluded from an exhibition hosted by a City institution, in 2015, in a bizarre act of censorship that was later reported in Private Eye Magazine.

'Unseen', also, in the sense that they are a semi-fictional take on London. Imagery is often plundered from the past to inform the present. So anything from a small terracotta maquette to a monumental Canova sculpture might materialise in unexpected places like London's Embankment or the riverside adjacent to the City. There are rarely specific stories in these paintings however, so the spectator is left to wonder at their enigmatic quality, curious juxtapositions, and engaging blend of fact and fiction. Innovative spatially as well, their perspective varies from conventional to 'mirror image'. Often bathed in strong light and deep shadow, they always have an evocative quality and vary in mood from playful to unsettling.

N.B. There was a tentative apology and an admission of being 'over-sensitive' from Lloyd's Register. Their decisions remain puzzling but the artist does not wish to discourage the company from using their prime City site for public art displays and offering an otherwise good deal to the artists they choose.